When Robert E. Lee marched his Army of North­ern Vir­ginia into Mary­land in early Sep­tem­ber 1862, Major Gen­eral George B. McClel­lan moved his reor­ga­nized and revi­tal­ized Army of the Potomac to meet him. The cam­paign included some of the blood­i­est, most dra­matic, and influ­en­tial com­bat of the entire Civil War …

Dr. Tom Clemens

Dr. Tom Clemens

One of the campaign’s par­tic­i­pants was Ezra A. Car­man, the colonel of the 13th New Jer­sey Infantry. After the hor­rific fight­ing of Sep­tem­ber 17, 1862, he recorded in his diary that he was prepar­ing “a good map of the Anti­etam bat­tle and a full account of the action.” The project became the most sig­nif­i­cant work of his life.

From hun­dreds of vet­er­ans’ accounts, thou­sands of let­ters, and dozens of maps, Car­man wrote an 1,800-page man­u­script on the cam­paign, from its start in north­ern Vir­ginia through McClellan’s removal from com­mand in Novem­ber 1862. It is the finest treat­ment of the cam­paign ever written.

Dr. Thomas G. Clemens, a fore­most his­to­ri­an of the Mary­land Cam­paign, has spent more than two decades study­ing the cam­paign and edit­ing and richly anno­tat­ing Carman’s exhaus­tively writ­ten man­u­script. The result is The Mary­land Cam­paign of Sep­tem­ber 1862. Jammed with first­hand accounts, per­sonal anec­dotes, maps, pho­tos, a bio­graph­i­cal dic­tio­nary, and a data­base of vet­er­ans’ accounts of the fight­ing, this long-awaited study will be read and appre­ci­ated as bat­tle his­tory at its finest.